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Business Reforms in China

= Doing Business reform making it easier to do business. Negative =  Change making it more difficult to do business.

DB2018

Starting a Business: China made starting a business easier by streamlining registration procedures. This reform applies to both Beijing and Shanghai.

Paying Taxes: China made paying taxes easier by introducing several measures for easing compliance.

DB2017

Starting a Business: China made starting a business easier by introducing a single form to obtain a business license, organization code and tax registration. This reform applies to both Shanghai and Beijing.

Getting Credit: China improved access to credit information by starting to report payment histories from utility companies and providing credit scores to banks and financial institutions. This reform applies to both Shanghai and Beijing.

DB2016

Paying Taxes: China made paying taxes less costly for companies in Shanghai by reducing the social security contribution rate.

DB2015

Starting a Business: China made starting a business easier by eliminating both the minimum capital requirement and the requirement to obtain a capital verification report from an auditing firm. This reform applies to both Beijing and Shanghai.

Paying Taxes: China made paying taxes easier for companies by enhancing the electronic system for filing and paying taxes and adopting new communication channels within its taxpayer service, changes applying to both Beijing and Shanghai. In addition, China made paying taxes less costly for companies in Shanghai by reducing the social security contribution rate.

DB2014

Getting Credit: China improved its credit information system by introducing credit information industry regulations, which guarantee borrowers’ right to inspect their data.

Enforcing Contracts: China made enforcing contracts easier by amending its civil procedure code to streamline and speed up all court proceedings.

DB2013

Starting a Business: China made starting a business less costly by exempting micro and small companies from paying several administrative fees from January 2012 to December 2014.

Dealing with Construction Permits: China simplified the process of obtaining a construction permit by streamlining and centralizing preconstruction approvals.

DB2011

Paying Taxes: China’s new corporate income tax law unified the tax regimes for domestic and foreign enterprises and clarified the calculation of taxable income for corporate income tax purposes.

DB2010

Trading across Borders: China made trading across borders easier by relaxing trade credit restrictions.

DB2009

Getting Credit: China strengthened its secured transactions system through a new property law expanding the range of assets that can be used as collateral, now including accounts receivable and a changing pool of assets.

Paying Taxes: China made paying taxes easier and less costly for companies by unifying the criteria and accounting methods for tax deductions and by reducing the corporate income tax rate.

Enforcing Contracts: China strengthened its contract enforcement system by tightening the rules on enforcement of judgments so as to limit the ways in which debtors can hide assets and escape enforcement.

Labor Market Regulation: China established paid annual leave and introduced priority rules for redundancy dismissals or layoffs.

DB2008

Dealing with Construction Permits: China reduced delays in dealing with construction permits by introducing electronic processing of applications for building permits and allowing construction companies to apply for safety certificates online.

Getting Credit: China strengthened its secured transactions system through a new law entitling secured creditors to priority in payment.

Resolving Insolvency: China enhanced its insolvency process through a new enterprise bankruptcy law introducing reorganization procedures, allowing for the formation of creditors’ committees, granting rights to secured creditors and establishing a role for professional bankruptcy administrators.